Wednesday, April 12, 2006

Calling all horticulturalists



I've been seeing these everywhere--bushes that feature branches with startlingly bright red bark, almost as though they've been dipped in paint (even brighter than in the photo). I've never noticed them before, although I can be fairly certain they're not a new phenomenon.

So, what are they? Any bush experts here, of the botanical variety?

13 Comments:

At 6:42 PM, April 12, 2006, Blogger Sissy Willis said...

Off hand, I'd say Cornus sericea . . . Redosier Dogwood. Check to see if the branches are opposite --MADCAPHORSE is a botanist's easy reference to the major genera that are opposite as opposed to alternate branching: Maple, Ash, Dogwood, Caprifoliaceae and Horse Chestnut.

 
At 6:47 PM, April 12, 2006, Blogger Sissy Willis said...

Pix for comparison

 
At 8:14 PM, April 12, 2006, Blogger jlbussey said...

Yep. Red Twig Dogwood. We've got them all over the place around here. (Western Washington)

 
At 10:36 PM, April 12, 2006, Blogger neo-neocon said...

Thank you everyone.

Now I'm wondering--why is it I've never noticed them before? They are very striking.

 
At 3:04 AM, April 13, 2006, Blogger camojack said...

"Any bush experts here, of the botanical variety?"

Yeah, you would have to clarify that, huh?

 
At 8:08 AM, April 13, 2006, Blogger Goesh said...

I would have guessed a scrub Red Willow tree.

 
At 10:47 AM, April 13, 2006, Blogger neo-neocon said...

camojack: I'm glad somebody acknowledged my little attempt at a pun :-).

 
At 11:39 AM, April 13, 2006, Anonymous R Neumeier said...

If you want to plant one at your home, there are red-twig dogwoods, willows, and maples; if you can place a shrub to be lit from the front the color will show up best. Young twigs are the best colored, so you have to prune to keep the young twigs down where you can see them. One possible reason these wild shrubs just became more visible is -- maybe the highway department etc cut them back hard last year and they put on a burst of young twigs down low and in greater abundance.

 
At 12:05 PM, April 13, 2006, Blogger dloye said...

Hmmmm, could some similar bit of vegitation be the origin of Baton Rouge? The story is that a red stick was placed in the ground to mark the place, I believe. Pretty plant. I'll check and see if it's grown in the southlands.

 
At 12:14 PM, April 13, 2006, Blogger Gabriel Malor said...

"I'm glad somebody acknowledged my little attempt at a pun :-)."

That's actually a hilarious triple entendre. (Well, it is if you have a dirty mind.)

 
At 2:50 PM, April 13, 2006, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Here - Colorado - it would be a willow. As the winter continues the carotene and chlorophyll that were initially in the bark cease to show, leaving the anthocyanin visible. By next fall, when the leaves drop, the bark will look yellow, and gradually get red until the following April.

 
At 4:13 PM, April 13, 2006, Anonymous Ruth H said...

Yes, red osier dogwood grows in Louisiana. I'm not sure if it is exactly the same one but surely it is of the same family.

 
At 3:03 AM, April 14, 2006, Blogger camojack said...

At 1:14 PM, April 13, 2006, Gabriel Malor said...
"I'm glad somebody acknowledged my little attempt at a pun :-)."

That's actually a hilarious triple entendre. (Well, it is if you have a dirty mind.)


Indeed; and I noticed that too...but I decided that discretion is the better part of valor. :-D

 

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