Friday, July 22, 2005

San Francisco

In San Francisco today, and it's not even foggy. I am fortunate enough to be staying with relatives/friends who live not far from the Golden Gate Bridge.

Who doesn't love San Francisco? It's such a unique and lovely city--and of course there's the food. I hope I don't give the impression I'm obsessed with food--but, well, it is one of the major pleasures of life, and San Francisco is one of the best places to indulge. So, I plan to do just that, and there's a birthday celebration (not mine) this evening that should provide a good venue for doing so.

Whenever I drive or walk around this beautiful place, the thought keeps recurring to me: what do they do about these hills in the snow? How can they get up them in the ice? And then I remember that no, I'm not in New England, and there's never any snow here. For some reason that's a hard concept for me.

4 Comments:

At 2:20 PM, July 22, 2005, Blogger Pancho said...

Lucky you, wish I were there. I spent many happy moments in San Francisco throughout my life. The Presidio is one of the most beautiful spots in America....I'd be interested to see it's redevelopment after it's Army days.

 
At 5:04 PM, July 22, 2005, Blogger Bookworm said...

If you like dim sum, don't miss Yank Sing, over on Spear and Mission in the old Rincon Center.

 
At 5:59 PM, July 22, 2005, Anonymous E.M.H. said...

Warning: Seafood at the tourist traps on the Fisherman's Wharf is not all it's cracked up to be. It's not actually bad, but like my mother said: "It's like Red Lobster, only twice as much" (she meant cost, not portion size).

And my aunt (well, honorary aunt; no actual blood relation, just a long friendship with mom) kept on telling us to eat in "Little Chinatown" if we wanted real asian food. Problem is, I don't know where the heck that is. By the way, the conversation was in the context of "Chinatown's not bad, but the real food is **here** (Little Chinatown)."

Now, I've **never** heard anyone else who knows San Francisco use that term, and I've gotten a couple of blank stares in response (gotta find an actual native of the city...). Does anyone know the area she's talking about? It's been so long, I don't remember how to get there; I just remember it being vaguely southwest of the Tenderloin district.

And Neo, ma'am:
1. You don't have to qualify your statement about liking food. It is a wonderful thing to enjoy, after all. One of the first things I wonder about in a new city is "where are the good restaurants?", and I know my friends feel the same way. Food is a big pleasure for humans, and sampling excellent fare in even just a limited number of places is a positive addition to one's life.

2. Regarding the streets: I actually thought the same thing. Except it took a whole afternoon for the fact that I'm in a place where it doesn't snow to kick in. Felt really dumb when it finally did; thank goodness I didn't make the observation out loud.

I did notice, however, that you'd better keep your brakes in top condition in that city. Those hills are steeeeeeeeeeep!.

 
At 5:54 AM, July 23, 2005, Anonymous strcpy said...

"Whenever I drive or walk around this beautiful place, the thought keeps recurring to me: what do they do about these hills in the snow? How can they get up them in the ice? And then I remember that no, I'm not in New England, and there's never any snow here. For some reason that's a hard concept for me."

Well, come to East Tennessee during our few weeks of ice and snow - you don't leave the house and hope the ice storms don't cut your power.

One of the great, and terrible, things of living here is that we go from lots of heat to bitter cold - not as hot as arizona, not as cold as new england - but add in the humidity and both feel really bad (good thing is don't like hot? wait a few months and you got cold, reverse that also, a little further south and all you have is hot).

There are two great "Others are idiots" (no, we don't really believe that, but like everyone there are things that take one by surprise - we regularly use hot water to remove ice from the car, I've been told that is a Bad Idea in the northern US) periods is during August and Feburary. Arizona type climates think 95-105 weather is easy, never mind 90-100% humidity with a dew point in the low 90's upper 80's (yes, lots of afternoon rain - watch your national radar in the afternoon). Then the "I can drive in the snow/ice" northerners - always in a ditch forgetting that they usually drive on flat land and well salted/prepared roads - not steep hills and plain tires that only get ice for two or three weeks of the year.

I suppose each area has thier "others are funny" moments.

 

Post a Comment

<< Home


Powered by Blogger